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ABOUT US

Dr. Nathan Keiser

Dr. Nathan Keiser DC, DACNB, FABBIR is a board certified chiropractic neurologist specializing in non-surgical, non-pharmaceutical treatment of dysautonomia, traumatic brain injury, and movement disorders. Dr. Keiser was certified as a diplomate in chiropractic neurology by the American Board of Chiropractic Neurology (ACNB) in 2010 and has since served patients from across North America and around the globe in private practice.

 

In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Keiser serves as an Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology for the Carrick Institute, which provides Post-Graduate instruction for doctors of all disciplines in the field of clinical and functional neurology.  He is actively involved in ongoing research and presents regularly across North America and Europe. 

 

Outside the clinic, Dr. Keiser is relishing life in the beautiful Great Lakes State with his family and friends. After work, you can usually find him coaching baseball, or sending routes in the climbing gym.

 

Training

Earned specialty recognition in vestibular rehabilitation, childhood developmental disorders, neurochemistry, movement disorders and traumatic brain injury.   

 

Worked under Dr. Ted Carrick, pioneer of functional neurology and renowned clinical research fellow at Harvard Medical School, as part of his Clinical Staff in Atlanta, GA. 

 

Earned a fellowship to the American Board of Brain Injury Rehabilitation and currently serves as a board member.

 

Education

  • B.S. Kinesiology 2005- Michigan State University 

  • Doctorate of Chiropractic 2009  - Life University (Marietta, GA)

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Dr. Claire Keiser

Dr. Claire Keiser DC, DACNB, FABBIR is board certified chiropractic neurologist specializing in the non-surgical, non-pharmaceutical treatment of dysautonomia, traumatic brain injury, and movement disorders. Dr. Keiser was certified as a diplomate in chiropractic neurology by the American Board of Chiropractic Neurology (ACNB) in 2010 after graduating from Life University.

 

Since 2018, she’s taken a step back from her clinical work to stay at home with the Keiser’s 3 young children. She currently serves as the clinic’s administrative lead. Her vast clinical knowledge is an asset as the primary point of contact for patients before they come to the clinic, and as an additional resource during treatment. 

 

Outside of ensuring the clinic runs smoothly and her duties as Keiser Mom Extraordinaire, Claire is an avid Crossfit athlete and loves to experiment in the kitchen. 

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Our Approach

Observe. Measure. Treat. Repeat.

 

 

Our Principles of Care

 

Be Human First.

At Nathan Keiser Chiropractic Neurology, this is where it all starts. Each patient has their own story and an entire life outside of whatever brings them in. We make it our top priority to treat each patient the way that we would want to be treated. 

 

Ask Why.

When we observe, we ask why something is or isn’t happening. This way we can better understand and treat the underlying cause of the presenting dysfunction.

 

Don’t assume the diagnosis; Prove it.

Doctors are not exceptions to human fallibility, so we never just assume. 

No matter what diagnosis a patient may have when they enter, we perform our examinations with unbiased, fresh eyes. We question our assumptions Only by and validate our work to ensure we get to the root cause of a patient’s neurological dysfunction.


Precise Prescription

Applying the right treatments in the correct dosage for each individual patient is a primary reason for our patients’ success. If you are just starting out in the gym and have a goal of bench pressing 200lbs, a good coach wouldn't tell you to go put 200lbs on the bar and let it slam repeatedly into your chest. Similarly, we won’t have you skipping thorough important progressions in the clinic. Just like muscle cells, brain cells have a specific capacity to do work. Too little stimulus won’t do anything, but too much can be detrimental. It is our job to find the optimal amount of stimulus for our patients to make steady progress.